“When the Lenin monument was dismantled in the city of Kolomyia, it turned out that it had been standing on top of Jewish gravestones”—Yuri Andrukhovych

The sixth German–Ukrainian meeting of writers belonging to the Paperbridge Circle took place on 10–11 September in the form of the Paperbridge Circle 2020 telebridge between Ivano-Frankivsk and Berlin. The conversation with the writer Yuri…

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(Pt. 1) Jewish communities on the territory of Ukraine in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries: An interview with the researcher Natalya Starchenko

What do we know about the life of Jewish communities on the territory of Ukraine in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries? How did people of different cultures and religions coexist? How did they communicate? Did…

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“Besides its presence in biblical texts, classical Hebrew appears on stelae, plaques, and even on cave walls”— Dmytro Tsolin

Our guest on the show is Dmytro Tsolin, Doctor of Philology, professor, director of the Center for Jewish Studies at the National University of Ostroh, associate professor at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, and the author…

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“It is important to re-evaluate Ukraine as a territory of freedom and patronage, a defender of minorities”— Oles Kulchynsky

We are talking about the South of Ukraine, the intersection of cultures and civilizations. Our guest on today’s show is the Orientalist and translator Oles Kulchynsky. Oles Kulchynsky: The Black Sea Lowland [Prychornomoria] is an…

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People do not want to remember because they are afraid of finding out something that is incompatible with their self-image—Sofia Andrukhovych

On the Encounters program, we are continuing our conversation with the writer, translator, and journalist Sofia Andrukhovych about her novel Amadoka. We discuss how to distinguish valuable documents in archives from trash, the history of…

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The idea for the novel Amadoka sprang from an interest in Viktor Petrov and the persecution and destruction of the Ukrainian intelligentsia in the 1930s—Sofia Andrukhovych

The title of the book, Amadoka, is derived from the name of the largest lake in Europe, situated on the territory of contemporary Ukraine. The novel is not about the lake but about its disappearance,…

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In the 1960s and 1970s, the USSR began to fear an alliance between Ukrainians and Jews. Therefore, the authorities published works aimed at causing a rift between them—Myroslav Shkandrij

We are continuing our conversation about the image of the Jew and the depictions of the Jewish community in twentieth-century Ukrainian literature. Our guest on the show is Myroslav Shkandrij, a literary historian, art specialist,…

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